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Irresistible‘ Review: Stewart writes, directs lifeless political satire


Brent Leuthold

Whatzup Features Writer

Published June 24, 2020

When Jon Stewart closed out his 16-year run as the host of The Daily Show in 2015, his departure sparked many questions about what he would do next in his career. 

Outside of his admirable advocacy and activism on behalf of 9/11 first responders, Stewart has largely spent the past five years staying out of the limelight, opting for the quieter life on his secluded New Jersey farm. 

Alas, the satirist extraordinaire finally emerges as the director and sole credited writer of Irresistible, a toothless and tired political comedy which lacks the deft hand and finger-on-the-pulse urgency that Stewart displayed on each episode of his 22 Emmy award-winning show.

Daily Show alum Steve Carell stars as Gary Zimmer, a political strategist for the DNC who is shell-shocked by the results of the 2016 presidential election. 

Desperately looking for a rebound for the Democratic Party, he finds a town hall video of retired Marine colonel Jack Hastings (Chris Cooper) making an impassioned plea for the undocumented workers of his small town of Deerlaken, Wisconsin. 

Zimmer sees in Hastings an opportunity to restore the recently-decimated Blue Wall, and upon meeting him, he convinces Hastings to run for mayor in a historically Republican-run city. 

Zimmer’s efforts to prop up a burgeoning Democrat in the Heartland catches the attention of RNC consultant Faith Brewster (Rose Byrne). With the power of Super PACs and wealthy donors behind both candidates, the mayoral race soon becomes headline news.

The overall form of Irresistible is nothing we haven’t seen before: a fish out of water story about a city slicker (a D.C. insider, in this case) who is forced to mingle with “normal folk” and in doing so, finds out he’s more out of touch than he realized. 

Where Stewart looks to distinguish his tale is in its lambasting of our broken political system. While he does land a few zingers that cut to the core of the dysfunction, so much of the humor is either too dated or too broad to resonate. 

Stewart made a name for himself sharply deriding the news media for their bias toward conflict and sensationalism, so it’s a bit of a letdown when his most cutting criticism on the subject this time around involves 12 talking heads bickering at each other simultaneously.

When he does take aim at the folly of the modern electoral process from the tedium of focus groups to the influence of big data, Stewart simply doesn’t offer as much fresh insight as he thinks he does. 

But the biggest issues with Irresistible don’t reveal themselves until the miserably contrived third act, where the lynchpin argument for campaign finance reform is clumsily unpacked upon the already ridiculously far-fetched plot. 

Even more insulting are the unfunny tacked-on fake-out credits in the vein of 2018’s Vice and then a mid-credit interview in which Stewart literally grills former FEC chairman Trevor Potter about the plausibility of the events that he just laid out before his audience.

Despite the self-aggrandizement and sermonizing, it would be a lie to say that the film doesn’t score some laughs despite itself. In the arena of more broad humor, Carell and Byrne fare much better with their playfully profane banter as they gleefully cross party lines. 

Perhaps the funniest lines come at the end of the fake campaign ads, which are paid for by faux special interest groups like Powerful Progressives For Strength and Wisconsinites For Religiously Based Compassionate Empathy. 

Stewart is a fine satirist, an underrated interviewer, and an effective activist, but based on Irresistible, he has a way to go as a filmmaker.

Also new to streaming this weekend:

Available on Netflix is Eurovision Song Contest: The Story of Fire Saga, a comedy starring Will Ferrell and Rachel McAdams about a pair of Icelandic singers who compete on behalf of their country in the titular music competition.

Available on Amazon Prime is My Spy, an action comedy starring Dave Bautista and Chloe Coleman about a CIA agent who finds himself at the mercy of a precocious 9-year-old girl, part of a family that he is surveilling undercover.

Available on demand is Run with the Hunted, a crime drama starring Sam Quartin and Ron Perlman about a woman who becomes determined to track down the boy who saved her life as a child and then disappeared.

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